Hot Survival Training How-Tos

How To: Make a simple coyote well water filter

When you're trying to survive in the wild, clean water is an absolute must. This video shows you a simple and easy method to build a basic water's edge, water filter device called a coyote well water filter. Though this filter will NOT remove toxins or pathogens, in an emergency it's an effective way of filtering out the big, nasty stuff.

How To: Tie the "Asheley's flower knot" flower knot variation

In this how-to video from the TyingItAllTogether Channel, learn how to tie Clifford W. Ashley's flower knot. Ashley is the author and illustrator of a book he wrote about tying various types knots, including ones that he created himself. In his book, Ashley shows how to tie this knot, but does not show in his illustrations how to actually hold and tie the knot in one's hand. This video tutorial seeks to clarify those steps. You will need to begin with a piece of rope folding it in half to eff...

How To: Tie a perfect "good luck" knot

In this knot-tying tutorial, we learn how to fasten a perfect "good luck" knot—a knot so named because it is said one requires quite a lot of luck to tie it properly. Not so, says video creator TyingItAllTogether. For all of the relevant details, and to get started tying this knot yourself, take a look.

How To: Modify your machete for the bush

In this video, we learn how to modify your machete for the bush. First, you can sharpen your blade on a piece of wood. You will produce wood shavings that will produce fire as well. Push down on the sides of the knife as well as base and on the tip and middle. Make sure you slightly sharpen the back as well so you can use it to open up coconuts. Once you do this, you will have five useful edges on your machete that you can use for many different purposes while you are out traveling. You can a...

How To: Tie a bent solomon bar on a line

The Solomon Bar is one of the more versatile ties in the paracording genre of knot tying. Although most prefer the straight line, in this video you will learn how to tie a bent line in your knot. You will get a full tutorial of the entire process with each step shown up close with extreme detail.

How To: Tie the basket weave knot

In this video, we learn how to tie the basket weave knot. First, place the string on a hook, then cross the two sides and make a loop. Next, make the loop wider and take the right and left strings up, then pull the loops down to make a pretzel shape. Now, twist the bottom loops around and place one on top of the other. After this, push them on either side of each other, then bring the right string around and loop it through the left loop, then bring the left string into the right bottom loop....

How To: Make a Royal Crown Sinnet

A Royal Crown Sinnet is a sinnet created by alternating wall knots and crown knots stacked on top of one another. This creates pretty, thick sinnet that anyone would be thrilled to have adorn their keychain, especially if you use alternating colored chords like they do in this video to create a very cool effect.

How To: Make a wooden spear from scratch

Making a wooden spear requires a between medium and small thick stick, a rectangular piece of board, a hatchet and a wood clipper. The branches off the stick is removed and thrown away. The stick is clipped at the smaller end. It is then placed on the board and the larger end is cut off with the hatchet, while the stick rotates in a circular motion on the board to remove the outer skin. Closer attention is paid the shaping and cutting of the point of that larger side to get it in formation. T...

How To: Locate water in a dry desert water bed

When trying to locate water in a dry desert look around to see if there are any disingenuous trees since these trees are usually near lakes and falls. Once you have located one find a low spot or a damp area near the tree. Using a stick or another tool available dig a hole into the area until you find water. Make sure to keep the edges of the hole your digging nice and round so that the hole won't fall in on it self. When you've found water it should flow into the hole. The water is usable so...

How To: Make a spear for hunting in the wild

This is a method for making a native American free point spear using a bamboo stick, bamboo strips and some commonly found items. First take a sea shell and make a hole in it. Make the hole using a pointed stone and pierce an opening in the shell. Make the hole such that the shell fits the bamboo. Now the bamboo has to be split in half and for this you have to find a common stone which has a sharp edge on one side to split the bamboo. This is a common stone found anywhere. Now you have to tak...

How To: Start a fire with quartz

Making a fire is important in order to stay warm and more importantly stay alive. In this video tutorial you'll find out how to use a quartz, old file, and the back end of your knife to help start a fire. And again, remember that fire can be dangerous and cause major damage to not only you but to the environment. So be careful!

How To: Make a teepee from an inexpensive tarp

Ever wanted to build a backyard teepee? Here's your chance! In this two-part tutorial, learn how to contruct an inexpensive teepee out of a tarp. Easy to set-up, this teepee is roomy and fun to play in no matter what age you are! If in the wilderness, use this teepee for reliable shelter from cold or warm weather.

How To: Easily use a clock as a compass

This how to video explains how to use a clock as a compass if needed. To start, simply place a clock on a flat surface and place a match in the very center of the clock so that the shadow of the match is even with the hour dial. North will be located at the midpoint between the 12 on the clock and wherever the shadow of the match is cast. The video then shows an example of the application by using a piece of paper and a pin. The narrator shows how the user can go about finding where north is ...

How To: Tie a Turk's Head knot

There are many different types of knots and each has its own purposes. This video of "Knot of the Week" features the Turk's Head knot. The video explains and demonstrates each step in tying this knot. This knot is generally used to tie around an object of cylinder shape, but it can be deformed for other shapes. By the end of this video, if the viewers follow the instructions correctly, they should be able to tie their very own Turk's Head knot.

How To: Tie a bloody knuckle knot

A bloody knuckle knot is the result of a row of half hitches fused with a blood knot--this video teaches you how to tie one. Make two loops with your rope then loop them over your thumb. Take the tail of the rope and keep making loops and adding them to the others on your thumb, to produce a row of loops. When you have five loops, slide them off your thumb, take the end of the rope and pass it through the loops. Pull out the slack but do not tighten, then take the other tail and pass it throu...

How To: Tie a single-strand ringbolt hitch

JD of Tying it all together, is the instructor. He has many instructional knot tying videos. This particular video is focused on tying a single strand ringbolt hitch, A.K.A. Coxcombing. This was a common knot used by sailors to decorate items and parts of their ship. However, actually creating this tie is much easier said than done.

How To: Escape from Dual Zip Tie Handcuffs

You are not having a good day. You've been abducted by sinister folks, and your hands are tied by a pair of zip ties bound together. How will you escape? In this tutorial, the guys at ITS Tactical show you how to escape from these bound cable ties, which are frequently used as makeshift handcuffs by police and military personnel, along with mischievous kidnappers. To break free, believe it or not, all you need is a little force.

How To: Coil 550 parachute cord

Here is a technique for coiling parachute cord or any other thin rope / twine. Learn how to survive in the wild. You never know when you'll be stranded on a desert island, lost in the deep woods, or be a contender for Survival, the TV show. This series of videos, by Hedgehog Leatherworks, brings you the basics in outdoor survival. Wilderness survival skills include fire starting, deadfall traps, primitive fishing, making jerky, rope & cordage skills, and more. For the outdoor enthusiasts, enj...

How To: Identify local poisonous plants as a Boy Scout

Tenderfoot is the first rank earned as a Boy Scout. The requirements of becoming a Tenderfoot provide basic skills to begin preparing the scout for higher adventure outings. Earning badges and receiving recognition can be very satisfying to boys. However, keep in mind that the badge is only a representation of a valuable set of skills that a scout has learned and demonstrated. The skills, wisdom, and experience gained through the activities of the scouting program are of much more value than ...

How To: Orient a map and use a compass as a Boy Scout

Second Class Boy Scouts work on building their outdoor survival and camping skills. Compass work, nature observation, camp tools, and swimming are areas where new skills are mastered and demonstrated. A second class scout, having completed all the requirements, should be able to lead a hike, care for his own equipment, set up a campsite, and perform basic first aid.

How To: Use and not use lashings as a Boy Scout

As a Boy Scout, when the First Class rank is attained, a scout has learned all the basic camping and outdoors skills of a scout. He can fend for himself in the wild, lead others on a hike or campout, set up a camp site, plan and properly prepare meals, and provide first aid for most situations he may encounter. A First Class scout is prepared.

How To: Tie the West Country Whipping Knot

Learn how to tie the West Country Whipping Knot! This animated knot tying tutorial is the best you'll find. With this knot tying how to, you can tie the West Country Whipping Knot fast or slow, or pause it at every step along the way. Learn to tie knots for your next outdoor trip. Tie the West Country Whipping Knot.

How To: Build a shelter in the Savannah

Check out this instructional safety video that demonstrates how to build a shelter in the Savannah. Rock walls, leaf roofs, and elephant dung mattresses might not make for the most ideal lodging, but they will protect you from the elements, and that is what really matters in the African Savannah. Check out this safety tutorial video and learn how to build a shelter in the Savannah. Build a shelter in the Savannah.