How To: Hike five miles with a map and compass as a Boy Scout

Second Class Boy Scouts work on building their outdoor survival and camping skills. Compass work, nature observation, camp tools, and swimming are areas where new skills are mastered and demonstrated. A second class scout, having completed all the requirements, should be able to lead a hike, care for his own equipment, set up a campsite, and perform basic first aid.

How To: Build & Hide a Campfire from Your Enemies — The Dakota Fire Pit

Fire.  It’s everywhere— always has been.  From the Ordovician Period where the first fossil record of fire appears to the present day everyday uses of the Holocene.  Today, we abundantly create flames (intentionally or unintentionally) in power plants, extractive metallurgy, incendiary bombs, combustion engines, controlled burns, wildfires, fireplaces, campfires, grills, candles, gas stoves and ovens, matches, cigarettes, and the list goes on... Yet with our societies' prodigal use of fire, t...

How To: Purify Urine for Drinking with an Emergency Solar Still

It’s called Urophagia—the art of consuming urine. There could be any number of reasons for having the desire to drink your own urine (or somebody else’s). There’s the so-called term “urine therapy,” which uses human urine as an alternative medicine. In urine therapy, or uropathy, it’s used therapeutically for various health, healing, and cosmetic purposes. There’s also those people who drink urine as sexual stimulation, where they want to share every part of each other. And then there’s the o...

How To: Make a teepee from an inexpensive tarp

Ever wanted to build a backyard teepee? Here's your chance! In this two-part tutorial, learn how to contruct an inexpensive teepee out of a tarp. Easy to set-up, this teepee is roomy and fun to play in no matter what age you are! If in the wilderness, use this teepee for reliable shelter from cold or warm weather.

How To: Tie a slip bowline knot

A bowline knot can tighten up really easily, in such a way that it's a headache to get the rope untied. The slip bowline knot, however, has a pull tab that releases the knot when you're ready. Watch this video knot-tying tutorial and learn how to tie a slip bowline knot.

How To: Make your own compass

Matt Preye shows you how to make your own emergency compass. Here are two ways of making your own compass: If you have a sewing needle and a magnet you can magnetize the needle by running it down the magnet a few times. Find some stagnant water and set a leaf in it. Now set the pin down on the leaf, and the leaf will swing just like a compass. If you don't have anything other than the sun, you can do the following: Put a stick in the ground and then add more sticks at 9am, 11am, 1pm, 2pm and ...

How To: Make a tin can survival cook stove

This is a how-to on how to make a survival cook stove instead of spending $25 to buy one online. It is a simple projecting that requires an old can, a pair of scissors, and a knife. Be careful and pay attention to his excellent instructions! Watch this video survival training tutorial and learn how to build a cook stove out of a tin can.

How To: Escape from Dual Zip Tie Handcuffs

You are not having a good day. You've been abducted by sinister folks, and your hands are tied by a pair of zip ties bound together. How will you escape? In this tutorial, the guys at ITS Tactical show you how to escape from these bound cable ties, which are frequently used as makeshift handcuffs by police and military personnel, along with mischievous kidnappers. To break free, believe it or not, all you need is a little force.

How To: Tie a rising sun knot

In this beautifully crafted video by Tiat presents the keyhole weave method of tying the rising sun. Grab about a yard of smooth decorative twine and you are ready to follow along. You will end up tying both the double coin and the ring of coin knots to make create the rising sun. But, fear not, the demonstration is clear and simple to follow.

How To: Build a fire in the snow

What to do if you're lost & freezing in Antarctica? Build a fire to keep warm! Yes, fires can be built successfully in cold and wet conditions with the right tools & preparation. In this eight-part series of short videos, Fitclimb survival instructor Ali teaches how to build a fire in the snow in 15 minutes. You can build this fire with just two tools: a knife and a metal match (magnesium stick). In part one, Ali talks about site preparation and how to choose and prepare the right site for a ...

How To: Make natural long burning torches in the forest

In this tutorial, we learn how to make natural long burning torches in the forest. First, use a dead tree limb and rip off all the bark that is on it. Next, gather up the bark from the tree and tie it together with wire you carry with you. Also, gather up a dead stick and connect this to the dead bark as well. Use a multi-tool to cut the wire if you are in a hurry. Once finished, light the bark on fire and you will have a natural torch that will burn in the forest! Be sure to use a dead tree ...

How To: Make a double spring snare trap

Making traps is a lost art. Landmines are facing international condemnation, hunting is barely allowed anywhere. There just aren't that many reason to make them anymore. But don't let that stop you! This video will teach you how to make a double spring snare trap using only basic wilderness materials. Hopefully you'll catch more rabbits this way than Elmer Fudd did.

How To: Make a quick bow in the wilderness

John Campbell, from azbushman, demonstrates how to make a quick bow and arrow in the wilderness by collecting natural materials and constructing them with cord. He starts by finding seep willow (also called coyote willow) that grows in clumps near rivers. He cuts ten willow sticks and ranges their lengths from about five feet down to about one foot, each a couple of inches shorter than the next.

How To: Start a fire with quartz

Making a fire is important in order to stay warm and more importantly stay alive. In this video tutorial you'll find out how to use a quartz, old file, and the back end of your knife to help start a fire. And again, remember that fire can be dangerous and cause major damage to not only you but to the environment. So be careful!

How To: Create an Ojibwa bird trap

The Pathfinder School offers bird enthusiasts this video tutorial that shows how to construct an Ojibwa Bird Trap. Using a series of sticks, anyone can learn how to create this bird trap, which works when a bird's weight triggers a snare. Learn the tips and techniques of what works and what doesn't in terms of materials to create a successful Ojibwa bird trap. The tutorial will explain what size sticks you need and how the trap should be constructed to successfully catch a bird.

How To: Tie a trucker's hitch

The trucker's hitch is a good, strong knot with many uses. It's ideal for securing a load in a vehicle, and was used that way dating back to the days of wagons hauled by horses. In this video the folks at ITS Tactical teach you how to tie a trucker's hitch, quick and easy.

How To: Coil 550 parachute cord

Here is a technique for coiling parachute cord or any other thin rope / twine. Learn how to survive in the wild. You never know when you'll be stranded on a desert island, lost in the deep woods, or be a contender for Survival, the TV show. This series of videos, by Hedgehog Leatherworks, brings you the basics in outdoor survival. Wilderness survival skills include fire starting, deadfall traps, primitive fishing, making jerky, rope & cordage skills, and more. For the outdoor enthusiasts, enj...

How To: Tie a pegged bowline knot

The pegged bowline, as demonstrated in this how-to video, is similar to a bowline on a bighte knot. Using pegs to construct knots is well documented. Simply tie the bowline as usual in the bight of the rope then peg the running end to the standing part. Watch this video knot-tying tutorial and learn how to tied a pegged bowline knot.

How To: Eat & extract water from a cactus

John Campbell demonstrates how to eat and extract water from a cactus. You can eat a cactus from the hedgehog plant family. First, cut off the top of the cactus and skin down the sides, cutting off the cactus spines. Cutting the cactus will not hurt it because it can heal itself. The cactus meat will be like a sticky cucumber. Try to avoid the central core because it is stringy but you can eat the cactus meat. Wrap the meat in a bandana, squish it and wring it out to extract the water from th...

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