How To: Build & Hide a Campfire from Your Enemies — The Dakota Fire Pit

Fire.  It’s everywhere— always has been.  From the Ordovician Period where the first fossil record of fire appears to the present day everyday uses of the Holocene.  Today, we abundantly create flames (intentionally or unintentionally) in power plants, extractive metallurgy, incendiary bombs, combustion engines, controlled burns, wildfires, fireplaces, campfires, grills, candles, gas stoves and ovens, matches, cigarettes, and the list goes on... Yet with our societies' prodigal use of fire, t...

How To: How the Headrest in Your Vehicle Can Potentially Save Your Life One Day

If you ever find yourself in a car that's submerged under water, your first instinct should be to try and open either the window or the door in the first few seconds of touching water. Unfortunately, if you wait any longer than that, the lopsided ambient water pressure subjected to the car will make it impossible to open the car door, and the now ubiquitous power windows will likely short out. Sure, you could wait until the pressure has equalized on both sides of the car, but this usually hap...

How To: Eat & extract water from a cactus

John Campbell demonstrates how to eat and extract water from a cactus. You can eat a cactus from the hedgehog plant family. First, cut off the top of the cactus and skin down the sides, cutting off the cactus spines. Cutting the cactus will not hurt it because it can heal itself. The cactus meat will be like a sticky cucumber. Try to avoid the central core because it is stringy but you can eat the cactus meat. Wrap the meat in a bandana, squish it and wring it out to extract the water from th...

How To: Tie a Slip Clove Hitch Knot

The slip clove hitch is very similar to the clove hitch knot, except that it's easier to untie. This is the knot used by cowboys to tie up their horses. Follow along with this video survival training tutorial and learn how to tie a slip clove hitch knot.

How To: Recycle your own urine

Sounds gross, but urine is actually the most sterile of our body's wastes, and is recyclable if needed. This video shows you how to do it at home. Unfortunately, it probably won't help you much in an emergency unless you carry around sugar and charcol at all times.

How To: Tie the Celtic heart knot

In this video, we learn how to tie the Celtic heart knot. Start off with your rope and make a loop in the middle of it. Now, bring the working en on the right side into the loop so you have a circle. Now, bring that end back into the knot and braid it through the other loop. Next, push this through the bottom loop, then braid it through the lines that are on the shape. After this, you will see a heart shape start to form. Pull gently on the heart with both sides of the rope and shape the midd...

How To: Purify Urine for Drinking with an Emergency Solar Still

It’s called Urophagia—the art of consuming urine. There could be any number of reasons for having the desire to drink your own urine (or somebody else’s). There’s the so-called term “urine therapy,” which uses human urine as an alternative medicine. In urine therapy, or uropathy, it’s used therapeutically for various health, healing, and cosmetic purposes. There’s also those people who drink urine as sexual stimulation, where they want to share every part of each other. And then there’s the o...

How To: Make a survival fire from a battery and staple

Check out this how-to video to start a fire using an AA battery and a staple. You can do this while listening to the classical guitar piece, "Malaguena" if you feel like it. It could save your life! With your battery: start by cutting the plastic away from the negative terminal. Watch the video survival training tutorial for more tips on starting an emergency fire!

How To: Make fire without matches using acetone and magnesium

In this how-to video, you will learn how to make fire without using any matches. You will need Manganese heptoxide and acetone to do this experiment. You will also need a rod, pipette, and glass beaker. Please exercise caution before doing this experiment, as it involves fire. Place the Manganese heptoxide in the glass beaker. Using a pipette, place a few drops of acetone around it. Now, place a drop on top. Be careful, as the Manganese heptoxide will ignite as soon as the drop hits the mater...

How To: Tie hammock hanging knots

The knots demonstrated in this how-to video are a good way to hang a hammock, because it makes it so easy to adjust your hanging height. The whipping knot around the tree will not slip if tied correctly. Make sure to tie the second half hitch or the knot may slip and come loose. As with all knots, use your own discretion and be safe. Watch this video survival training tutorial and learn how to tie some sturdy knots useful for hammock-hanging.

How To: Start a fire with a battery and a staple

This young fellow demonstrates how to start a fire using a battery and a staple. He suggest you begin with a staple or any thin wire, a AA battery and a knife. On the negative terminal of the battery, he cuts off a piece of the insulation by following the small ring on the battery. Pay attention to the small ring between the top of the terminal and the casing. Look for the gap that has some paper material and pry that up. Insert the staple below the paper into the gap. As you move the staple,...

How To: Carve a net needle out of wood

Carving a net needle from wood is probably easier than you think as long as you have your trusty Swiss army knife at hand. It has a wide array of available tools in a small unit. First you will need a piece of balsa wood. It should be 1/8 of an inch thick by 3 inches wide and 8 inches tall. Using the sharp narrow blade of the knife, you will cut 3 reference holes in a triangular pattern. The points of the triangle should be 1 inch apart at the bottom and the triangle should be 2 inches high. ...

How To: Tie a Turk's Head (Woggle) decorative knot

Learn how to tie the Turk's Head Woggle Knot. This animated knot tying tutorial is the best you'll find. With this knot tying how to, you can tie the Turk's Head Woggle Knot fast or slow, or pause it at every step along the way. Learn to tie knots for your next outdoor trip. Tie a Turk's Head (Woggle) decorative knot.

How To: Tie the Sailmaker's Whipping Knot

Learn how to tie the Sailmaker's Whipping Knot. This animated knot tying tutorial is the best you'll find. With this knot tying how to, you can tie the Sailmaker's Whipping Knot fast or slow, or pause it at every step along the way. Learn to tie knots for your next outdoor trip. Tie the Sailmaker's Whipping Knot.

How To: Make a quick bow in the wilderness

John Campbell, from azbushman, demonstrates how to make a quick bow and arrow in the wilderness by collecting natural materials and constructing them with cord. He starts by finding seep willow (also called coyote willow) that grows in clumps near rivers. He cuts ten willow sticks and ranges their lengths from about five feet down to about one foot, each a couple of inches shorter than the next.

How To: Orient a map and use a compass as a Boy Scout

Second Class Boy Scouts work on building their outdoor survival and camping skills. Compass work, nature observation, camp tools, and swimming are areas where new skills are mastered and demonstrated. A second class scout, having completed all the requirements, should be able to lead a hike, care for his own equipment, set up a campsite, and perform basic first aid.

How To: Boil water without proper equipment

This video is a demonstration of an easy way to boil water while camping. Simply take a plastic bottle, fill it to the top with no space for air, close the bottle, start a fire and place the bottle in the fire. Since there is no air in the bottle it won't melt. After a couple minutes you will have boiling water. Careful removing the bottle from the fire.

How To: Tie two half-hitches knots as a Boy Scout

Tenderfoot is the first rank earned as a Boy Scout. The requirements of becoming a Tenderfoot provide basic skills to begin preparing the scout for higher adventure outings. Earning badges and receiving recognition can be very satisfying to boys. However, keep in mind that the badge is only a representation of a valuable set of skills that a scout has learned and demonstrated. The skills, wisdom, and experience gained through the activities of the scouting program are of much more value than ...

How To: Tie cylinder, mat and ball Turk's head knots

In this Disaster Preparation video tutorial you will learn how to tie cylinder, mat and ball Turk's head knots. To tie the cylinder, first tie the double coin knot as shown in the video. Then put it around a staff and make the 3-lead 4-bight Turk's Head. After you finish with this, tighten and trim the rope. To tie the 3L4B Turk's Head as a mat, remove the Turk's Head from the staff and follow the steps as shown in the video to make the mat. You can watch the video and learn how to tie the ball.

How To: Tie a Button Knot lanyard

Think you're a knot master? Have you mastered the Button Knot? Simple and elegant, the Button Knot makes for more than just a decorative button; It makes for a wonderful lanyard leash. From Tying It All Together, learn how to tie a Button Knot lanyard in a just a few steps.

How To: Start a fire using a firestarter

This video demonstrates how to make a fire without any matches using the Swedish Firesteel magnesium fire starter. You need to have some good tinder, such as dryer lint or a cotton ball. To make it burn longer, you can use petroleum jelly. He puts some Vaseline on the cotton ball. He demonstrates the fire starter by putting one metal part on the dryer lint and scraping the other part on it. A spark lights the dryer lint and it burns quickly. He demonstrates again with the cotton ball soaked i...

How To: Tie a Turk's Head knot

There are many different types of knots and each has its own purposes. This video of "Knot of the Week" features the Turk's Head knot. The video explains and demonstrates each step in tying this knot. This knot is generally used to tie around an object of cylinder shape, but it can be deformed for other shapes. By the end of this video, if the viewers follow the instructions correctly, they should be able to tie their very own Turk's Head knot.

How To: Tie a great hangman's noose (or hangman's knot)

The hangman's noose is infamous for its use in hanging prisoners during executions. It supposedly was invented in Britain, but eventually spread throughout the world, going beyond the prisons, even into our own homes. But the hangman's knot isn't all doom and gloom. There are plenty of useful (and non-lethal) applications for the hangman's knot, like as a fishing or boating knot. Everyone should know this roped knot, and this tutorial will show you the knot-tying process. Just remember, to be...

Prev Page