Hot Survival Training Posts

How To: Use a parang knife (Malayan machete) in the tropical wild

If you're ever stuck in the jungles of Southeast Asia, then your only hope for survival is the parang knife, which is a Malayan type machete. This is the ideal tool for the jungle, especially in Malaysia, where the typical vegetation is more woody, and needs something thicker for stronger chopping action. A parang has three different edges: the front is very sharp and used for skinning, the middle is wider and used for chopping, and the back end (near the handle) is very fine and used for car...

How To: Tie a paracord storage sinnet

In this video, we learn how to tie a paracord storage sinnet. First, coil up the paracord and then form a bight with the working part at the top of the coils. Next, create a loop from the bight and pull the loose part underneath this and pull it underneath the loop you created. Now, tighten the new loop up and then take the loose part and place it underneath to create a new loop. Push this through the other loop, then tighten with the loose end. This is a very difficult knot to do and is not ...

How To: Build an Emergency Rucksack with a Poncho & Rope (The Horseshoe Pack)

There’s a good chance that you’ll be alone in life one day, and no... I’m not talking about a couch-bound, dateless loser with a pocket pussy and a bag of potato chips. I’m talking about alone. In the wilderness. Hungry. Cold. Lost. You can’t stay in one place too long, so it would be nice to have something to carry your belongings in. Maybe it’s post-apocalyptic land where you’re the sole survivor, and all the backpacks and rucksacks in the world are but mere ash. Either way, knowing this si...

How To: Make a Royal Crown Sinnet

A Royal Crown Sinnet is a sinnet created by alternating wall knots and crown knots stacked on top of one another. This creates pretty, thick sinnet that anyone would be thrilled to have adorn their keychain, especially if you use alternating colored chords like they do in this video to create a very cool effect.

How To: Make a Spartan spear from scratch at home

To make your very own Spartan Spear, like in the movie 300, you just have to follow a few short, easy instructions. Start off by taking a broom stick, and cutting off the end. Make sure your broom stick is empty inside. Then take a hammer and flatten the last few inches of it, hammering it into a point or a flat blade at the end. Cut off part of the tip at an angle on either side, then open it back up with pliers. A few inches below the opening, take your pliers and press in on the broom stic...

How To: Make a quick bow in the wilderness

John Campbell, from azbushman, demonstrates how to make a quick bow and arrow in the wilderness by collecting natural materials and constructing them with cord. He starts by finding seep willow (also called coyote willow) that grows in clumps near rivers. He cuts ten willow sticks and ranges their lengths from about five feet down to about one foot, each a couple of inches shorter than the next.

How To: Boil water without pots or pans

This video illustrate how to boil water without pots or pans. Here are the following steps:Step 1: You need fire, water and any plastic container with lid.Step 2: Now take water and fill it in the bottle so that there is no air present in the bottle.Step 3: Now put on the fire and put the seal bottle on fire with a distance of around 12 inch.Step 4: Now let the heat warm up the bottle and be careful while handling the bottle.Step 5: After the water has heated up, bubbles will appear in the bo...

How To: Make an arrow and tent pole bow

There's nothing like the great outdoors. The fresh air, the seperation from today's society, and being in a quiet relaxing environment. So in this two part tutorial, for all you nature lovers, find out what it takes to make an arrow and a tent pole bow. Enjoy!

How To: Survive a zombie apocalypse

Worried about a zombie apocalypse? Of course you are, we all are! This tongue in cheek video divulges the steps you'll need to take should zombies begin roaming the earth. Using clips from horror movies, this video shows you the right way to hide from zombies and even explains who you can trust. Learn what weapons work on zombies and how to cripple them and most importantly, destroy their brain! Nobody wants to get bitten by a zombie, learn how to escape, travel and even how to recognize if o...

How To: Use a compass with no problems

David Wilcox and Caitlyn Szyska demonstrate how to use a compass without a problem. Parts of a compass include the ring, the orienteering arrow, magnetic needle, direction of travel arrow and declination scale. First, hold the compass out in front of you, making sure you hold it level. Move your whole body and point the direction of travel arrow to the object that you want to reach. Move the ring until the magnetic needle is lined up with the orienteering arrow pointing north. Once they are l...

How To: Cook under a tarp in rain

This is a video about shelter cooking. We are shown how people who are hammock camping in the rain are able to cook under their tarp. This is important because you have to have some way to cook under your shelter when it rains, and there's no way you can have a fire under there without getting smoked out. It makes life easier if you can set up a stove inside your shelter to cook on. We are shown two ways to do this, and both systems work well. One way is to use an alcohol stove. You can make ...

How To: Build a fire in the snow

What to do if you're lost & freezing in Antarctica? Build a fire to keep warm! Yes, fires can be built successfully in cold and wet conditions with the right tools & preparation. In this eight-part series of short videos, Fitclimb survival instructor Ali teaches how to build a fire in the snow in 15 minutes. You can build this fire with just two tools: a knife and a metal match (magnesium stick). In part one, Ali talks about site preparation and how to choose and prepare the right site for a ...

How To: Tie a single-strand ringbolt hitch

JD of Tying it all together, is the instructor. He has many instructional knot tying videos. This particular video is focused on tying a single strand ringbolt hitch, A.K.A. Coxcombing. This was a common knot used by sailors to decorate items and parts of their ship. However, actually creating this tie is much easier said than done.

How To: Tie useful knots in a survival situation

If you somehow find yourself stranded in the woods, you'll need to know how to tie strong knots. But it's actually just as important to know how to untie knots. You probably have limited rope, after all, and you'll need to re-use it. In this video Reggie Bennett from the Mountain Shepherd Survival School shows us how to tie and untie knots.

How To: Coil 550 parachute cord

Here is a technique for coiling parachute cord or any other thin rope / twine. Learn how to survive in the wild. You never know when you'll be stranded on a desert island, lost in the deep woods, or be a contender for Survival, the TV show. This series of videos, by Hedgehog Leatherworks, brings you the basics in outdoor survival. Wilderness survival skills include fire starting, deadfall traps, primitive fishing, making jerky, rope & cordage skills, and more. For the outdoor enthusiasts, enj...

How To: Rescue someone in the water as a Boy Scout

Second Class Boy Scouts work on building their outdoor survival and camping skills. Compass work, nature observation, camp tools, and swimming are areas where new skills are mastered and demonstrated. A second class scout, having completed all the requirements, should be able to lead a hike, care for his own equipment, set up a campsite, and perform basic first aid.

How To: Use the three R's of personal safety as a Boy Scout

Second Class Boy Scouts work on building their outdoor survival and camping skills. Compass work, nature observation, camp tools, and swimming are areas where new skills are mastered and demonstrated. A second class scout, having completed all the requirements, should be able to lead a hike, care for his own equipment, set up a campsite, and perform basic first aid.

How To: Tie the Double Loop Bowline knot

The Double Loop Bowline: learn knot tying. Here's another way to tie a bowline in a doubled rope. The Double Loop Bowline knot was generally used at sea for lowering an injured man from aloft, by putting one leg is put through each loop. Use this knot tying animation to learn how to tie the Double Loop Bowline knot. Tie the Double Loop Bowline knot.

How To: Tie the Boy Scout Sheep Shank knot

Learn how to tie the Sheep Shank Knot. This animated knot tying tutorial is the best you'll find. With this knot tying how to, you can tie the Sheep Shank Knot fast or slow, or pause it at every step along the way. Learn to tie knots for your Boy Scout requirements. Tie the Boy Scout Sheep Shank knot.

How To: Tie the adjustable bend knot

The Adjustable Bend, demonstrated in this how-to video, was invented by the Canadian climber Robert Chisnall sometime before 1982. More accurately a coupling of two identical knots, the bend is a great way of lengthening or shortening two rope ends tied together. Watch this video survival training tutorial and learn how to tie the adjustable bend knot.

How To: Tie a tensioning knot

The tensioning knot, demonstrated in this how-to video, is a useful way to tie the strands of my whips to the rope machine. It is also useful anytime that quick tension is needed and a truckers hitch is too much or the distance is too short. Tie a noose in the line and snug it up then a slippery half hitch locks it in place. Watch this video knot-tying tutorial and learn how to tie a tensioning knot.

How To: Tie an adjustable bowline knot

This how-to video demonstrates a way of tying a bowline to adjust the snugness of the bowline on your winch or whatever you have tied it to. Tie the bowline as usual. Pull the top of the eye and the bottom of the turn apart then pull on both of the strands exiting the loop to capsize the knot. Then snug it up and reset it. Watch this video knot-tying tutorial and learn how to tie an adjustable bowline knot.

How To: Tie knots to hang an easy hammock

This how-to video demonstrates the easiest way to make a hammock. Simple, easy and safe, with no sewing required, make a hammock anytime in a pinch. All you need is fabric, rope, and the knot-tying skills from this instructional video. Watch this video tutorial and learn how to make an easy hammock.

How To: Tie a clove hitch on a carabiner

As the clove hitch knot is adjustable and slipper, it can be useful attached to a carabiner, allowing the load to move fluidly up and down the rope. However, the clove hitch is not particularly useful or advisable as a securing knot. Watch this video survival training tutorial and learn how to tie a clove hitch knot on a carabiner.

How To: Tie a slip bowline knot

A bowline knot can tighten up really easily, in such a way that it's a headache to get the rope untied. The slip bowline knot, however, has a pull tab that releases the knot when you're ready. Watch this video knot-tying tutorial and learn how to tie a slip bowline knot.

How To: Make your own fire piston

Watch this how-to video and make a lighter that never runs out of fuel and that's so simple, it can't break. It works just like a Diesel engine - as air is rapidly compressed it heats to over 800 degrees. You can make one for just a couple dollars. This video tutorial will show you how to be prepared in the wilderness, or the apocalypse. Just make your own fire piston.