Hot Survival Training Posts

How To: Tie a single-strand ringbolt hitch

JD of Tying it all together, is the instructor. He has many instructional knot tying videos. This particular video is focused on tying a single strand ringbolt hitch, A.K.A. Coxcombing. This was a common knot used by sailors to decorate items and parts of their ship. However, actually creating this tie is much easier said than done.

How To: Build an Apache foot trap snare for catching large game

Procuring food in the wild is key if you're going to survive. The bigger your catch, the longer you'll be able to survive. This instructional video shows how to build and bait an Apache foot trap, for catching large game such as deer, moose, elk, or bear. You'll need a hatchet, several branches, some grape vine pieces, a length of paracord or bankline and a hole in the ground.

How To: Make a tin can survival cook stove

This is a how-to on how to make a survival cook stove instead of spending $25 to buy one online. It is a simple projecting that requires an old can, a pair of scissors, and a knife. Be careful and pay attention to his excellent instructions! Watch this video survival training tutorial and learn how to build a cook stove out of a tin can.

How To: Coil 550 parachute cord

Here is a technique for coiling parachute cord or any other thin rope / twine. Learn how to survive in the wild. You never know when you'll be stranded on a desert island, lost in the deep woods, or be a contender for Survival, the TV show. This series of videos, by Hedgehog Leatherworks, brings you the basics in outdoor survival. Wilderness survival skills include fire starting, deadfall traps, primitive fishing, making jerky, rope & cordage skills, and more. For the outdoor enthusiasts, enj...

How To: Make an cord eye splice for wilderness survival uses

Here is the technique for creating a strong sleek loop in a natural length of cordage... perfect for many wilderness survival applications. Learn how to survive in the wild. You never know when you'll be stranded on a desert island, lost in the deep woods, or be a contender for Survival, the TV show. This series of videos, by Hedgehog Leatherworks, brings you the basics in outdoor survival. Wilderness survival skills include fire starting, deadfall traps, primitive fishing, making jerky, rope...

How To: How the Headrest in Your Vehicle Can Potentially Save Your Life One Day

If you ever find yourself in a car that's submerged under water, your first instinct should be to try and open either the window or the door in the first few seconds of touching water. Unfortunately, if you wait any longer than that, the lopsided ambient water pressure subjected to the car will make it impossible to open the car door, and the now ubiquitous power windows will likely short out. Sure, you could wait until the pressure has equalized on both sides of the car, but this usually hap...

How To: Make a wooden spear from scratch

Making a wooden spear requires a between medium and small thick stick, a rectangular piece of board, a hatchet and a wood clipper. The branches off the stick is removed and thrown away. The stick is clipped at the smaller end. It is then placed on the board and the larger end is cut off with the hatchet, while the stick rotates in a circular motion on the board to remove the outer skin. Closer attention is paid the shaping and cutting of the point of that larger side to get it in formation. T...

How To: Make your own compass

Matt Preye shows you how to make your own emergency compass. Here are two ways of making your own compass: If you have a sewing needle and a magnet you can magnetize the needle by running it down the magnet a few times. Find some stagnant water and set a leaf in it. Now set the pin down on the leaf, and the leaf will swing just like a compass. If you don't have anything other than the sun, you can do the following: Put a stick in the ground and then add more sticks at 9am, 11am, 1pm, 2pm and ...

How To: Tie the Celtic heart knot

In this video, we learn how to tie the Celtic heart knot. Start off with your rope and make a loop in the middle of it. Now, bring the working en on the right side into the loop so you have a circle. Now, bring that end back into the knot and braid it through the other loop. Next, push this through the bottom loop, then braid it through the lines that are on the shape. After this, you will see a heart shape start to form. Pull gently on the heart with both sides of the rope and shape the midd...

How To: How to tie an eye splice with rope

The eye splice might sound like some horrible procedure from the lab of Dr. Frankenstein, but it's actually a very useful skill to learn for camping or disaster preparation. Eye splicing is a way to secure different strands of rope together so they're stronger than a knot. In this tutorial, the guys at ITS Tactical show us how to do an eye splice.

How To: Hike five miles with a map and compass as a Boy Scout

Second Class Boy Scouts work on building their outdoor survival and camping skills. Compass work, nature observation, camp tools, and swimming are areas where new skills are mastered and demonstrated. A second class scout, having completed all the requirements, should be able to lead a hike, care for his own equipment, set up a campsite, and perform basic first aid.

How To: Tie a tarbuck knot

The tarbuck knot is a non-jamming knot, great for when the rope will be bearing a heavy load, and shocked with sudden weight. Form the loop around the winch then make a serises of turns around the standing part in a clockwise direction. Bring the running end down to the base of the runs and make another clockwise turn finishing off with a figure eight through the exiting strand from the top turn. Watch this video knot-tying tutorial and learn how to tie a tarbuck knot.

How To: Make a primitive spear in the wild with only a knife

If you are in the wild and have nothing to do, just to play around with your knife , then you should surely watch this video. First, you have to find a knife. After that you must find a good branch or piece of wood that's the same size as a spear. After that you must take the branch or piece of wood and sharpen one of the ends. Then , you must put the sharpened end in the fire so it begins to turn black. After that cut it again and this time cut it so it will be sharp enough to cut. It can se...

How To: Tie a paracord bundle

The method of rope handling demonstrated in this how-to video came from the Japanese. Pirates during the warring states period used such bundles to secure prisoners among other shipboard duties and the bundle stays alive today in hojujitsu. A few fathoms of paracord in a pocket and a handier tool aboard a boat would be hard to find. Watch this video knot-tying tutorial and learn how to tie a paracord bundle.

How To: Tie a double fisherman's knot or double overhand knot

The double fishermen's knot, as demonstrated in this how-to video, is a safe knot to secure to separate lengths of rope together, forming high-strength loops of cord. This makes it useful in rock-climbing and in search and rescue, especially as a backup for other knots. Check out this video survival training tutorial and learn how to tie a double fisherman's knot or double overhand knot.

How To: Navigate through the jungle

When in the jungle, everything can look the same. Myke demonstrates how to navigate through the jungle. Using tress, Myke shows you how to find streams, rivers and tree lines to help you keep a steady path. He also illustrates how to create big fires to make black smoke signals. Navigate through the jungle.

How To: Tie a 7x5 Turks Head knot

In order to tie a 7 x 5 Turks Head Knot, you will need to begin by draping the rope or twine over the fingers of your outstretched hand. Fold your pink down, leaving your three fingers outstretched. Catch the string in front and hold it with your pinky.

How To: Purify muddy river water

In this video, we learn how to purify muddy river water. First, take a bucket of dirty river water straight from the river. This will be in a 2-5 gallon bucket. Now, add 1 packet of water Purifier per every 2 gallons. Stir this in for 5 minutes, stirring constantly. Once the powder has been in the water for a full 5 minutes, it will purify the water and the dirt will all go to the bottom of the bucket! This is being used in Haiti where an earthquake destroyed the homes of many people who now ...

How To: MAKE FIRE with a MAGNIFYING GLASS

90 seconds that could save your life. How to actually MAKE A FIRE with a lens, rather than just burning a hole in a leaf. (Or frying ants, which seems to be the other thing that kids like to do with magnifying glasses.) By forming your target material into an efficient ball, you will be able to start a fire even with very small lenses. Like less than an inch across small. The finer the individual fibres, and the more densely they are packed, the more effective is your ball of smigtin (smoulde...

How To: Tie the Sailor's Knot

The Sailor's Knot: learn knot tying. The Sailor's Knot is also called The Anchor Bend, Carrick Bend and Full Carrick Bend. It's easy to tie, does not slip easily in the wet, and is among the strongest of knots - it can't jam and is readily untied. Tie the Sailor's Knot.

How To: Harvest and then store trombone zucchini

Storing food by dehydrating, is a smart way to help prepare yourself, and others, for anything bad that may happen to the world. Many things can be dehyrdated and eaten years ahead into the future. Fruits, veggies, meat all can be stored for years. So in this tutorial, you'll be finding out how to harvest and then store trombone zucchini. It's an interesting looking veggie and is great with meals. Enjoy!

How To: Start a fire with a battery and a staple

This young fellow demonstrates how to start a fire using a battery and a staple. He suggest you begin with a staple or any thin wire, a AA battery and a knife. On the negative terminal of the battery, he cuts off a piece of the insulation by following the small ring on the battery. Pay attention to the small ring between the top of the terminal and the casing. Look for the gap that has some paper material and pry that up. Insert the staple below the paper into the gap. As you move the staple,...