Hot Survival Training Posts

How To: Prepare a personal first aid kit as a Boy Scout

Second Class Boy Scouts work on building their outdoor survival and camping skills. Compass work, nature observation, camp tools, and swimming are areas where new skills are mastered and demonstrated. A second class scout, having completed all the requirements, should be able to lead a hike, care for his own equipment, set up a campsite, and perform basic first aid.

How To: Complete an orienteering course as a Boy Scout

As a Boy Scout, when the First Class rank is attained, a scout has learned all the basic camping and outdoors skills of a scout. He can fend for himself in the wild, lead others on a hike or campout, set up a camp site, plan and properly prepare meals, and provide first aid for most situations he may encounter. A First Class scout is prepared.

How To: Do a line rescue in the water as a Boy Scout

As a Boy Scout, when the First Class rank is attained, a scout has learned all the basic camping and outdoors skills of a scout. He can fend for himself in the wild, lead others on a hike or campout, set up a camp site, plan and properly prepare meals, and provide first aid for most situations he may encounter. A First Class scout is prepared.

How To: Start a fire with quartz

Making a fire is important in order to stay warm and more importantly stay alive. In this video tutorial you'll find out how to use a quartz, old file, and the back end of your knife to help start a fire. And again, remember that fire can be dangerous and cause major damage to not only you but to the environment. So be careful!

How To: Make natural long burning torches in the forest

In this tutorial, we learn how to make natural long burning torches in the forest. First, use a dead tree limb and rip off all the bark that is on it. Next, gather up the bark from the tree and tie it together with wire you carry with you. Also, gather up a dead stick and connect this to the dead bark as well. Use a multi-tool to cut the wire if you are in a hurry. Once finished, light the bark on fire and you will have a natural torch that will burn in the forest! Be sure to use a dead tree ...

How To: Remove Maggots from Your Eyeball

While maggots living in human eyeballs isn't necessarily a problem in the states, it could happen to you one day if a fly decides your warm eyeball is a suitable place for its larvae. If this rare event should happen, before you start gouging your eyeball out, remember this trick from National Geographic explorer and engineer Albert Lin and everything will be okay.

How To: Build a fire in the snow

What to do if you're lost & freezing in Antarctica? Build a fire to keep warm! Yes, fires can be built successfully in cold and wet conditions with the right tools & preparation. In this eight-part series of short videos, Fitclimb survival instructor Ali teaches how to build a fire in the snow in 15 minutes. You can build this fire with just two tools: a knife and a metal match (magnesium stick). In part one, Ali talks about site preparation and how to choose and prepare the right site for a ...

How To: Make your own compass

Matt Preye shows you how to make your own emergency compass. Here are two ways of making your own compass: If you have a sewing needle and a magnet you can magnetize the needle by running it down the magnet a few times. Find some stagnant water and set a leaf in it. Now set the pin down on the leaf, and the leaf will swing just like a compass. If you don't have anything other than the sun, you can do the following: Put a stick in the ground and then add more sticks at 9am, 11am, 1pm, 2pm and ...

How To: Tie the basket weave knot

In this video, we learn how to tie the basket weave knot. First, place the string on a hook, then cross the two sides and make a loop. Next, make the loop wider and take the right and left strings up, then pull the loops down to make a pretzel shape. Now, twist the bottom loops around and place one on top of the other. After this, push them on either side of each other, then bring the right string around and loop it through the left loop, then bring the left string into the right bottom loop....

How To: Build an Emergency Rucksack with a Poncho & Rope (The Horseshoe Pack)

There’s a good chance that you’ll be alone in life one day, and no... I’m not talking about a couch-bound, dateless loser with a pocket pussy and a bag of potato chips. I’m talking about alone. In the wilderness. Hungry. Cold. Lost. You can’t stay in one place too long, so it would be nice to have something to carry your belongings in. Maybe it’s post-apocalyptic land where you’re the sole survivor, and all the backpacks and rucksacks in the world are but mere ash. Either way, knowing this si...

How To: Sharpen an axe or knife with the Boy Scouts

You never know when you may need to sharpen an axe... and who better to learn from than the Boy Scouts? Brace the axe head on the ground between a log about 6" in diameter and two woooden pegs or tent stakes. Sharpen your axe with an 8-10 inch mill bastard file. Be sure to wear leather gloves. Make a knuckle guard out of leather, plywood, or an old inner tube. Place the file on the edge of the blade and push it into the bit. Lift the file as you draw back for each stroke. Turn the axe around ...

How To: Tie the Double Loop Bowline knot

The Double Loop Bowline: learn knot tying. Here's another way to tie a bowline in a doubled rope. The Double Loop Bowline knot was generally used at sea for lowering an injured man from aloft, by putting one leg is put through each loop. Use this knot tying animation to learn how to tie the Double Loop Bowline knot. Tie the Double Loop Bowline knot.

How To: Boil water without proper equipment

This video is a demonstration of an easy way to boil water while camping. Simply take a plastic bottle, fill it to the top with no space for air, close the bottle, start a fire and place the bottle in the fire. Since there is no air in the bottle it won't melt. After a couple minutes you will have boiling water. Careful removing the bottle from the fire.

How To: Make an cord eye splice for wilderness survival uses

Here is the technique for creating a strong sleek loop in a natural length of cordage... perfect for many wilderness survival applications. Learn how to survive in the wild. You never know when you'll be stranded on a desert island, lost in the deep woods, or be a contender for Survival, the TV show. This series of videos, by Hedgehog Leatherworks, brings you the basics in outdoor survival. Wilderness survival skills include fire starting, deadfall traps, primitive fishing, making jerky, rope...

How To: Make char cloth to start emergency fires

Jason shows you in this video tutorial, how to make char cloth to start emergency fires. Making your own emergency fire-starting material could someday save your life! Making char cloth is an easy way to make an emergency fire starter with materials you already have lying around the house, for use in camping, backpacking, hiking, and survival in the wilderness.

How To: Build a shelter in the Savannah

Check out this instructional safety video that demonstrates how to build a shelter in the Savannah. Rock walls, leaf roofs, and elephant dung mattresses might not make for the most ideal lodging, but they will protect you from the elements, and that is what really matters in the African Savannah. Check out this safety tutorial video and learn how to build a shelter in the Savannah. Build a shelter in the Savannah.

How To: Make a paracord using a knitting spool

This short video shows how to get started with 550 paracord and a 3 peg/nail knitting spool made from a wooden napkin ring and 3 nails. This just show you how to start. Follow these steps: After the initial wrapping of the nails with the paracord at the bottom of the nail, you take the working end to the next nail above the cord that's wrapped around it, use a hook of some type to lift the lower cord up and over the top cord and the nail. Continue from one nail to the next, up and over with t...

How To: Tie an adjustable bowline knot

This how-to video demonstrates a way of tying a bowline to adjust the snugness of the bowline on your winch or whatever you have tied it to. Tie the bowline as usual. Pull the top of the eye and the bottom of the turn apart then pull on both of the strands exiting the loop to capsize the knot. Then snug it up and reset it. Watch this video knot-tying tutorial and learn how to tie an adjustable bowline knot.

How To: Convert any pack into an avalung avalanche safety pack

Before this ski season, I decided to add one more avalanche mitigation tool to my arsenal: the Avalung. This breathing device has been proven for several years to increase chances of survival if buried in an avalanche. To be effective, the Avalung must be worn over all clothing so that the intake and exhale portions are in contact with the snow. For most backcountry skiers, this can be a true pain. I already have a beacon strapped to my chest along with a pack, and if I'm patrolling, a radio ...

How To: Make a primitive wilderness loom

Staying warm is important to making sure that you survive. Whether it be the end of the world or you find yourself lost in the wilderness, keeping dry and warm is key to survival. In this two part tutorial find out how to make a primitive wilderness loom and a mat to sleep on.

How To: Make a wooden spear from scratch

Making a wooden spear requires a between medium and small thick stick, a rectangular piece of board, a hatchet and a wood clipper. The branches off the stick is removed and thrown away. The stick is clipped at the smaller end. It is then placed on the board and the larger end is cut off with the hatchet, while the stick rotates in a circular motion on the board to remove the outer skin. Closer attention is paid the shaping and cutting of the point of that larger side to get it in formation. T...

How To: Escape from Dual Zip Tie Handcuffs

You are not having a good day. You've been abducted by sinister folks, and your hands are tied by a pair of zip ties bound together. How will you escape? In this tutorial, the guys at ITS Tactical show you how to escape from these bound cable ties, which are frequently used as makeshift handcuffs by police and military personnel, along with mischievous kidnappers. To break free, believe it or not, all you need is a little force.

How To: Use and not use lashings as a Boy Scout

As a Boy Scout, when the First Class rank is attained, a scout has learned all the basic camping and outdoors skills of a scout. He can fend for himself in the wild, lead others on a hike or campout, set up a camp site, plan and properly prepare meals, and provide first aid for most situations he may encounter. A First Class scout is prepared.