Hot Survival Training Posts

How To: How the Headrest in Your Vehicle Can Potentially Save Your Life One Day

If you ever find yourself in a car that's submerged under water, your first instinct should be to try and open either the window or the door in the first few seconds of touching water. Unfortunately, if you wait any longer than that, the lopsided ambient water pressure subjected to the car will make it impossible to open the car door, and the now ubiquitous power windows will likely short out. Sure, you could wait until the pressure has equalized on both sides of the car, but this usually hap...

How To: Make a hammock without sewing

No place to sleep tonight? In a pinch, a little bit of rope and some fabric can be transformed into a hammock bed. This is a great skill for camping, emergency situations, or even communal living. Make sure to use a sturdy enough cloth, and replicate these same knots so that the hammock will support the weight. Check out this video survival training tutorial and learn how to make an emergency hammock without sewing.

How To: Make a primitive fishing hook from wood or thorn

Learn how to make a primitive fishing hook / fishing gouge from completely natural materials in a wilderness survival situation. Learn how to survive in the wild. You never know when you'll be stranded on a desert island, lost in the deep woods, or be a contender for Survival, the TV show. This series of videos, by Hedgehog Leatherworks, brings you the basics in outdoor survival. Wilderness survival skills include fire starting, deadfall traps, primitive fishing, making jerky, rope & cordage ...

How To: Make a cordage basket when out in the wild

Learn how to make a primitive basket for wilderness survival using natural cordage. Learn how to survive in the wild. You never know when you'll be stranded on a desert island, lost in the deep woods, or be a contender for Survival, the TV show. This series of videos, by Hedgehog Leatherworks, brings you the basics in outdoor survival. Wilderness survival skills include fire starting, deadfall traps, primitive fishing, making jerky, rope & cordage skills, and more. For the outdoor enthusiasts...

How To: Start a fire with a battery and a staple

This young fellow demonstrates how to start a fire using a battery and a staple. He suggest you begin with a staple or any thin wire, a AA battery and a knife. On the negative terminal of the battery, he cuts off a piece of the insulation by following the small ring on the battery. Pay attention to the small ring between the top of the terminal and the casing. Look for the gap that has some paper material and pry that up. Insert the staple below the paper into the gap. As you move the staple,...

How To: Make a survival fire from a battery and staple

Check out this how-to video to start a fire using an AA battery and a staple. You can do this while listening to the classical guitar piece, "Malaguena" if you feel like it. It could save your life! With your battery: start by cutting the plastic away from the negative terminal. Watch the video survival training tutorial for more tips on starting an emergency fire!

How To: Use and not use lashings as a Boy Scout

As a Boy Scout, when the First Class rank is attained, a scout has learned all the basic camping and outdoors skills of a scout. He can fend for himself in the wild, lead others on a hike or campout, set up a camp site, plan and properly prepare meals, and provide first aid for most situations he may encounter. A First Class scout is prepared.

How To: Make a paracord using a knitting spool

This short video shows how to get started with 550 paracord and a 3 peg/nail knitting spool made from a wooden napkin ring and 3 nails. This just show you how to start. Follow these steps: After the initial wrapping of the nails with the paracord at the bottom of the nail, you take the working end to the next nail above the cord that's wrapped around it, use a hook of some type to lift the lower cord up and over the top cord and the nail. Continue from one nail to the next, up and over with t...

How To: Coil 550 parachute cord

Here is a technique for coiling parachute cord or any other thin rope / twine. Learn how to survive in the wild. You never know when you'll be stranded on a desert island, lost in the deep woods, or be a contender for Survival, the TV show. This series of videos, by Hedgehog Leatherworks, brings you the basics in outdoor survival. Wilderness survival skills include fire starting, deadfall traps, primitive fishing, making jerky, rope & cordage skills, and more. For the outdoor enthusiasts, enj...

How To: Tie a right angle knot like Navy SEALS

You're underwater, and you need to tie a knot. (Hey, it could happen!) What do you do? In this tutorial from the folks at ITS Tactical, you'll learn how to tie a right angle knot. This is a knot used by navy SEALs, and if you ever end up needing to tie a knot underwater, you'll be very glad you watched this video.

How To: Tie a clove hitch on a carabiner

As the clove hitch knot is adjustable and slipper, it can be useful attached to a carabiner, allowing the load to move fluidly up and down the rope. However, the clove hitch is not particularly useful or advisable as a securing knot. Watch this video survival training tutorial and learn how to tie a clove hitch knot on a carabiner.

How To: Tie the basket weave knot

In this video, we learn how to tie the basket weave knot. First, place the string on a hook, then cross the two sides and make a loop. Next, make the loop wider and take the right and left strings up, then pull the loops down to make a pretzel shape. Now, twist the bottom loops around and place one on top of the other. After this, push them on either side of each other, then bring the right string around and loop it through the left loop, then bring the left string into the right bottom loop....

How To: Tie a single-strand ringbolt hitch

JD of Tying it all together, is the instructor. He has many instructional knot tying videos. This particular video is focused on tying a single strand ringbolt hitch, A.K.A. Coxcombing. This was a common knot used by sailors to decorate items and parts of their ship. However, actually creating this tie is much easier said than done.

How To: Tie a variation of the double bowline knot

The Double Bowline has the same strength as a figure eight knot but is simpler to tie. This variation of the double bowline knot differs from the original in that the end of the rope doubles back to go the same direction as the length, instead of hanging down into the loop. Watch this video knot-tying tutorial and learn how to tie a variation of the double bowline knot.

How To: Tie a Turk's Head knot

There are many different types of knots and each has its own purposes. This video of "Knot of the Week" features the Turk's Head knot. The video explains and demonstrates each step in tying this knot. This knot is generally used to tie around an object of cylinder shape, but it can be deformed for other shapes. By the end of this video, if the viewers follow the instructions correctly, they should be able to tie their very own Turk's Head knot.

How To: Tie the Sailmaker's Whipping Knot

Learn how to tie the Sailmaker's Whipping Knot. This animated knot tying tutorial is the best you'll find. With this knot tying how to, you can tie the Sailmaker's Whipping Knot fast or slow, or pause it at every step along the way. Learn to tie knots for your next outdoor trip. Tie the Sailmaker's Whipping Knot.

How To: Make a coal burned container

John Campbell shows you how to make an all natural bowl with spout using hot coals to burn the desired shape into a block of wood. First you'll need to make a straw from a cattail stock by burning through the center with a hot coat hanger. John next demonstrates how to use this straw and some hot coals placed on the wood to burn the shape of a bowl and spout into the block. Finally, John uses a stone to sand the bowl down and remove the charcoal leaving a clean wooden container. The final res...

How To: Rescue someone in the water as a Boy Scout

Second Class Boy Scouts work on building their outdoor survival and camping skills. Compass work, nature observation, camp tools, and swimming are areas where new skills are mastered and demonstrated. A second class scout, having completed all the requirements, should be able to lead a hike, care for his own equipment, set up a campsite, and perform basic first aid.

How To: Do a line rescue in the water as a Boy Scout

As a Boy Scout, when the First Class rank is attained, a scout has learned all the basic camping and outdoors skills of a scout. He can fend for himself in the wild, lead others on a hike or campout, set up a camp site, plan and properly prepare meals, and provide first aid for most situations he may encounter. A First Class scout is prepared.

How To: Make a primitive wilderness loom

Staying warm is important to making sure that you survive. Whether it be the end of the world or you find yourself lost in the wilderness, keeping dry and warm is key to survival. In this two part tutorial find out how to make a primitive wilderness loom and a mat to sleep on.

How To: Complete an orienteering course as a Boy Scout

As a Boy Scout, when the First Class rank is attained, a scout has learned all the basic camping and outdoors skills of a scout. He can fend for himself in the wild, lead others on a hike or campout, set up a camp site, plan and properly prepare meals, and provide first aid for most situations he may encounter. A First Class scout is prepared.

How To: Make a tin can survival cook stove

This is a how-to on how to make a survival cook stove instead of spending $25 to buy one online. It is a simple projecting that requires an old can, a pair of scissors, and a knife. Be careful and pay attention to his excellent instructions! Watch this video survival training tutorial and learn how to build a cook stove out of a tin can.

How To: Tie seven basic scout knots

How good of a scout were you? This how-to video goes over seven different knots that every boy scout should know how to tie. 7 knots every scout should know is filmed from the knot tying point of view. The bowline, clovehitch, sheetbend, tautline, timber hitch, square knot and two half hitch are covered. Watch this video knot-tying tutorial and learn how to do seven essential scouting knots.