Hot Survival Training How-Tos

How To: Purify Urine for Drinking with an Emergency Solar Still

It’s called Urophagia—the art of consuming urine. There could be any number of reasons for having the desire to drink your own urine (or somebody else’s). There’s the so-called term “urine therapy,” which uses human urine as an alternative medicine. In urine therapy, or uropathy, it’s used therapeutically for various health, healing, and cosmetic purposes. There’s also those people who drink urine as sexual stimulation, where they want to share every part of each other. And then there’s the o...

How To: Eat & extract water from a cactus

John Campbell demonstrates how to eat and extract water from a cactus. You can eat a cactus from the hedgehog plant family. First, cut off the top of the cactus and skin down the sides, cutting off the cactus spines. Cutting the cactus will not hurt it because it can heal itself. The cactus meat will be like a sticky cucumber. Try to avoid the central core because it is stringy but you can eat the cactus meat. Wrap the meat in a bandana, squish it and wring it out to extract the water from th...

How To: Build & Hide a Campfire from Your Enemies — The Dakota Fire Pit

Fire.  It’s everywhere— always has been.  From the Ordovician Period where the first fossil record of fire appears to the present day everyday uses of the Holocene.  Today, we abundantly create flames (intentionally or unintentionally) in power plants, extractive metallurgy, incendiary bombs, combustion engines, controlled burns, wildfires, fireplaces, campfires, grills, candles, gas stoves and ovens, matches, cigarettes, and the list goes on... Yet with our societies' prodigal use of fire, t...

How To: Build a fire in the snow

What to do if you're lost & freezing in Antarctica? Build a fire to keep warm! Yes, fires can be built successfully in cold and wet conditions with the right tools & preparation. In this eight-part series of short videos, Fitclimb survival instructor Ali teaches how to build a fire in the snow in 15 minutes. You can build this fire with just two tools: a knife and a metal match (magnesium stick). In part one, Ali talks about site preparation and how to choose and prepare the right site for a ...

How To: Make a wooden spear from scratch

Making a wooden spear requires a between medium and small thick stick, a rectangular piece of board, a hatchet and a wood clipper. The branches off the stick is removed and thrown away. The stick is clipped at the smaller end. It is then placed on the board and the larger end is cut off with the hatchet, while the stick rotates in a circular motion on the board to remove the outer skin. Closer attention is paid the shaping and cutting of the point of that larger side to get it in formation. T...

How To: Make a simple coyote well water filter

When you're trying to survive in the wild, clean water is an absolute must. This video shows you a simple and easy method to build a basic water's edge, water filter device called a coyote well water filter. Though this filter will NOT remove toxins or pathogens, in an emergency it's an effective way of filtering out the big, nasty stuff.

How To: Tie the "Asheley's flower knot" flower knot variation

In this how-to video from the TyingItAllTogether Channel, learn how to tie Clifford W. Ashley's flower knot. Ashley is the author and illustrator of a book he wrote about tying various types knots, including ones that he created himself. In his book, Ashley shows how to tie this knot, but does not show in his illustrations how to actually hold and tie the knot in one's hand. This video tutorial seeks to clarify those steps. You will need to begin with a piece of rope folding it in half to eff...

How To: Survive hiking in the Appalachian mountains

In this survival video series, learn how to survive hiking in the Appalachian Mountains from hiking expert David Jackel. David will teach you how to survive hiking in the Appalachian Mountains with camping tips and survival techniques such as how to pack for a camping trip in the Appalachians, how to choose footwear for hiking in the mountains, how to find firewood in the Appalachians, how to start a fire, how to find shelter when hiking, how to handle rain in the Appalachian Mountains, how t...

How To: Build an Apache foot trap snare for catching large game

Procuring food in the wild is key if you're going to survive. The bigger your catch, the longer you'll be able to survive. This instructional video shows how to build and bait an Apache foot trap, for catching large game such as deer, moose, elk, or bear. You'll need a hatchet, several branches, some grape vine pieces, a length of paracord or bankline and a hole in the ground.

How To: Boil water without pots or pans

This video illustrate how to boil water without pots or pans. Here are the following steps:Step 1: You need fire, water and any plastic container with lid.Step 2: Now take water and fill it in the bottle so that there is no air present in the bottle.Step 3: Now put on the fire and put the seal bottle on fire with a distance of around 12 inch.Step 4: Now let the heat warm up the bottle and be careful while handling the bottle.Step 5: After the water has heated up, bubbles will appear in the bo...

How To: Make a parasling from #550 paracord

Ever hear of David and Goliath? Well the weapon that David used was none other than a sling. A sling is a very old, but still effective tool that can possibly help save your life someday, especially when it comes to facing wild animals. Find out how to make a parasling using #550 paracord. Enjoy!

How To: Start a fire with a battery and a staple

This young fellow demonstrates how to start a fire using a battery and a staple. He suggest you begin with a staple or any thin wire, a AA battery and a knife. On the negative terminal of the battery, he cuts off a piece of the insulation by following the small ring on the battery. Pay attention to the small ring between the top of the terminal and the casing. Look for the gap that has some paper material and pry that up. Insert the staple below the paper into the gap. As you move the staple,...

How To: Identify and treat a 'hurry case' as a Boy Scout

Second Class Boy Scouts work on building their outdoor survival and camping skills. Compass work, nature observation, camp tools, and swimming are areas where new skills are mastered and demonstrated. A second class scout, having completed all the requirements, should be able to lead a hike, care for his own equipment, set up a campsite, and perform basic first aid.

How To: Tie the Boy Scout Sheep Shank knot

Learn how to tie the Sheep Shank Knot. This animated knot tying tutorial is the best you'll find. With this knot tying how to, you can tie the Sheep Shank Knot fast or slow, or pause it at every step along the way. Learn to tie knots for your Boy Scout requirements. Tie the Boy Scout Sheep Shank knot.

How To: Tie a tensioning knot

The tensioning knot, demonstrated in this how-to video, is a useful way to tie the strands of my whips to the rope machine. It is also useful anytime that quick tension is needed and a truckers hitch is too much or the distance is too short. Tie a noose in the line and snug it up then a slippery half hitch locks it in place. Watch this video knot-tying tutorial and learn how to tie a tensioning knot.

How To: Tie an adjustable bowline knot

This how-to video demonstrates a way of tying a bowline to adjust the snugness of the bowline on your winch or whatever you have tied it to. Tie the bowline as usual. Pull the top of the eye and the bottom of the turn apart then pull on both of the strands exiting the loop to capsize the knot. Then snug it up and reset it. Watch this video knot-tying tutorial and learn how to tie an adjustable bowline knot.

How To: Tie knots to hang an easy hammock

This how-to video demonstrates the easiest way to make a hammock. Simple, easy and safe, with no sewing required, make a hammock anytime in a pinch. All you need is fabric, rope, and the knot-tying skills from this instructional video. Watch this video tutorial and learn how to make an easy hammock.

How To: Tie a variation of the double bowline knot

The Double Bowline has the same strength as a figure eight knot but is simpler to tie. This variation of the double bowline knot differs from the original in that the end of the rope doubles back to go the same direction as the length, instead of hanging down into the loop. Watch this video knot-tying tutorial and learn how to tie a variation of the double bowline knot.

How To: Tie a quick clove hitch knot

While the clove hitch is not a particularly secure knot, it's useful in situations when the knot requires a little bit of give. The steps to tying this knot are demonstrated in this how-to video, and are shown at a fast pace so you can see how quick and easy it is to do. Watch this video knot-tying tutorial and learn how to tie a clove hitch knot quickly.

How To: Make a teepee from an inexpensive tarp

Ever wanted to build a backyard teepee? Here's your chance! In this two-part tutorial, learn how to contruct an inexpensive teepee out of a tarp. Easy to set-up, this teepee is roomy and fun to play in no matter what age you are! If in the wilderness, use this teepee for reliable shelter from cold or warm weather.

How To: Tie a 7x5 Turks Head knot

In order to tie a 7 x 5 Turks Head Knot, you will need to begin by draping the rope or twine over the fingers of your outstretched hand. Fold your pink down, leaving your three fingers outstretched. Catch the string in front and hold it with your pinky.

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