Hot Survival Training How-Tos

How To: Tie hammock hanging knots

The knots demonstrated in this how-to video are a good way to hang a hammock, because it makes it so easy to adjust your hanging height. The whipping knot around the tree will not slip if tied correctly. Make sure to tie the second half hitch or the knot may slip and come loose. As with all knots, use your own discretion and be safe. Watch this video survival training tutorial and learn how to tie some sturdy knots useful for hammock-hanging.

How To: Tie knots to hang an easy hammock

This how-to video demonstrates the easiest way to make a hammock. Simple, easy and safe, with no sewing required, make a hammock anytime in a pinch. All you need is fabric, rope, and the knot-tying skills from this instructional video. Watch this video tutorial and learn how to make an easy hammock.

How To: Tie a right angle knot like Navy SEALS

You're underwater, and you need to tie a knot. (Hey, it could happen!) What do you do? In this tutorial from the folks at ITS Tactical, you'll learn how to tie a right angle knot. This is a knot used by navy SEALs, and if you ever end up needing to tie a knot underwater, you'll be very glad you watched this video.

How To: Eat & extract water from a cactus

John Campbell demonstrates how to eat and extract water from a cactus. You can eat a cactus from the hedgehog plant family. First, cut off the top of the cactus and skin down the sides, cutting off the cactus spines. Cutting the cactus will not hurt it because it can heal itself. The cactus meat will be like a sticky cucumber. Try to avoid the central core because it is stringy but you can eat the cactus meat. Wrap the meat in a bandana, squish it and wring it out to extract the water from th...

How To: Make a survival fire from a battery and staple

Check out this how-to video to start a fire using an AA battery and a staple. You can do this while listening to the classical guitar piece, "Malaguena" if you feel like it. It could save your life! With your battery: start by cutting the plastic away from the negative terminal. Watch the video survival training tutorial for more tips on starting an emergency fire!

How To: Tie a pegged bowline knot

The pegged bowline, as demonstrated in this how-to video, is similar to a bowline on a bighte knot. Using pegs to construct knots is well documented. Simply tie the bowline as usual in the bight of the rope then peg the running end to the standing part. Watch this video knot-tying tutorial and learn how to tied a pegged bowline knot.

How To: Tie the Chain Sinnet, Chain Stitch, or Monkey Braid

Learn how to tie the Chain Sinnet Knot. This animated knot tying tutorial is the best you'll find. With this knot tying how to, you can tie the Chain Sinnet, Chain Stitch, or Monkey Braid Knot fast or slow, or pause it at every step along the way. Learn to tie knots for your next outdoor trip. Tie the Chain Sinnet, Chain Stitch, or Monkey Braid.

How To: Identify animals in your community as a Boy Scout

Second Class Boy Scouts work on building their outdoor survival and camping skills. Compass work, nature observation, camp tools, and swimming are areas where new skills are mastered and demonstrated. A second class scout, having completed all the requirements, should be able to lead a hike, care for his own equipment, set up a campsite, and perform basic first aid.

How To: Start a fire with a battery and a staple

This young fellow demonstrates how to start a fire using a battery and a staple. He suggest you begin with a staple or any thin wire, a AA battery and a knife. On the negative terminal of the battery, he cuts off a piece of the insulation by following the small ring on the battery. Pay attention to the small ring between the top of the terminal and the casing. Look for the gap that has some paper material and pry that up. Insert the staple below the paper into the gap. As you move the staple,...

How To: Make a tin can survival cook stove

This is a how-to on how to make a survival cook stove instead of spending $25 to buy one online. It is a simple projecting that requires an old can, a pair of scissors, and a knife. Be careful and pay attention to his excellent instructions! Watch this video survival training tutorial and learn how to build a cook stove out of a tin can.

How To: Boil water on a leaf in the wilderness

This video shows a tip on how to boil water on a leaf in the wilderness. If you are stuck out in the wilderness and you don't have a plastic bottle for water you can use a leaf to boil water for drinking. Build a fire first. Then find a large enough leaf you can hold it over the fire without burning your hands. Fill the leaf with water and hold it over the fire. Only let the flames lick up against the leaf so it won't burn. The edges will curl up closed but the water will boil in about ninety...

How To: Apply bandages to sprained ankles as a Boy Scout

As a Boy Scout, when the First Class rank is attained, a scout has learned all the basic camping and outdoors skills of a scout. He can fend for himself in the wild, lead others on a hike or campout, set up a camp site, plan and properly prepare meals, and provide first aid for most situations he may encounter. A First Class scout is prepared.

How To: Tie the padlock knot

The padlock knot is designed to look like a padlock, but without the actual function of one. In order to tie this knot take your rope or string and fold it in half. After you have done that make a loop with both sides of the rope making sure you leave a loop at the top. Put the two loops together the one in the front turning clockwise and the one in the back counter-clockwise. Make sure to leave a hole in the center for the rope to pass through. Now wind each piece of rope through the hole in...

How To: Make and set an Asian bird trap snare

All North American birds are edible and therefore a good source of meat if you're trying to survive in the wild. This detailed video shows how to construct and bait an Asian bird trap snare. You'll need some 150lb test bankline, some twigs, an available young sapling and something to bait your trap, such as wild berries.

How To: Rescue someone in the water as a Boy Scout

Second Class Boy Scouts work on building their outdoor survival and camping skills. Compass work, nature observation, camp tools, and swimming are areas where new skills are mastered and demonstrated. A second class scout, having completed all the requirements, should be able to lead a hike, care for his own equipment, set up a campsite, and perform basic first aid.

How To: Make an ultra light alcohol stove

Check out this ultra light alcohol stove. It weighs only 1 oz and has no moving parts. You can make it yourself in just a few minutes and it will outlast most conventional stoves. Boils in under 5 minutes and the fuel is cheap. This is a perfect stove for ultra light backpacking!

How To: How to tie an eye splice with rope

The eye splice might sound like some horrible procedure from the lab of Dr. Frankenstein, but it's actually a very useful skill to learn for camping or disaster preparation. Eye splicing is a way to secure different strands of rope together so they're stronger than a knot. In this tutorial, the guys at ITS Tactical show us how to do an eye splice.

How To: Make a Hobo Stove

In every wilderness adventure, there needs to be some form of stove, even if it's only a fire. To prepare and heat canned or caught food, the stove is a must! In this two-part video tutorial, learn how to build your very own hobo stove with the help of a few tools: A number 10 tin can, knife, 2 tent sticks, a church key can opener, and a coat hanger.

How To: Make a paracord using a knitting spool

This short video shows how to get started with 550 paracord and a 3 peg/nail knitting spool made from a wooden napkin ring and 3 nails. This just show you how to start. Follow these steps: After the initial wrapping of the nails with the paracord at the bottom of the nail, you take the working end to the next nail above the cord that's wrapped around it, use a hook of some type to lift the lower cord up and over the top cord and the nail. Continue from one nail to the next, up and over with t...

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